Would a carbon border tax be effective as a tool as countries try to slow climate change?

Timothy Hamilton, Associate Professor of Economics, University of Richmond in the United States discusses on The Conversation website the potential impact of the border adjustment carbon tax that the EU is considering. What are your views?   The EU wants a carbon tax on imports – but would it be the climate solution officials expect? … Continue reading Would a carbon border tax be effective as a tool as countries try to slow climate change?

Impact of environmental taxes in the UK

A report from the UK National Audit Office acknowledges the benefits of taxation on organisations but questions what specific effects they achieve. Andrew Warren, chairman of the British Energy Efficiency Federation, discusses the issues in an article  in the April 2021 issue of Energy in Buildings & Industry.   Environmental taxes work – but we’re … Continue reading Impact of environmental taxes in the UK

Proposed carbon border levy would be strong signal to EU firms

Neil Kellard, Dean, Professor in Finance, Essex Business School at the University of Essex writes on The Conversation website about the impact of the proposed carbon border levy. What are your views?   Why the EU's proposed carbon border levy is an important test for global action on climate change In the more than two … Continue reading Proposed carbon border levy would be strong signal to EU firms

A carbon reduction incentive could neutralise the current opposition to carbon taxes while reducing carbon-intensive activities in a much more targeted and fair way

The accomplishments of carbon taxes over the last decade have been underwhelming. What if, instead of making fuel and other commodities and services more expensive, we used a financial incentive to make technologies that help reduce emissions – such as solar, wind and geothermal energy – more affordable? Sumedha Basu, PhD Candidate in Sustainability at … Continue reading A carbon reduction incentive could neutralise the current opposition to carbon taxes while reducing carbon-intensive activities in a much more targeted and fair way

While carbon taxes have their appeal, there are easier ways to fund sustainable energy

Steve Cohen writes on the Earth Institute website of Columbia University that efforts should be on reducing the costs of renewable energy rather than increasing the costs of fossil fuels. He states that we “need to stop scolding people for "misbehavior" and start figuring out how to reduce the environmental impact of the things that … Continue reading While carbon taxes have their appeal, there are easier ways to fund sustainable energy

There’s still no consensus on the cost of carbon

There's still no consensus on the cost of carbon, and it's blocking progress on emissions around the world, writes Andrew Warren, chair of the British Energy Efficiency Federation and a regular contributor to EiD.   It's been 30 years, and we still don't know how much to charge for carbon This year marks the thirtieth … Continue reading There’s still no consensus on the cost of carbon

Is giving breaks to industrial emitters the right way forward in the energy transition?

Shawn McCarthy writes in Canada’s Globe and Mail about the federal government’s plans to give breaks to industry from the ambitious environmental agenda in order to limit the economic impact. Is this really the way to proceed?   Ottawa prepares to relax carbon-pricing measures to aid industry competitiveness The Liberal government is set to introduce … Continue reading Is giving breaks to industrial emitters the right way forward in the energy transition?

The energy transition in Alberta

The collapse in oil prices has had a significant impact on the Canadian province of Alberta. The tar sands together with conventional fossil fuels have dominated the economy for decades. But the provincial government has had to diversify and it has been making good progress. Emma Graney writes a good article in the Edmonton Journal … Continue reading The energy transition in Alberta