Report on state of Energy Union provides a little gem on energy storage

On 25 February 2015, the European Commission adopted “A Framework Strategy for a Resilient Energy Union with a Forward-Looking Climate Change Policy”. Since then, the concept of the Energy Union has gained currency and plays a major role in bringing all the elements of energy policy together into a neat package.

This week, the Commission published its second annual report on the state of the Energy Union. EiD readers should give it good attention because it shows that the modernisation of the European Union economy and the transition to a low-carbon era are happening. And it is important as a scene setter as the November “winter package” – the Commission’s proposals for revising the current clean energy policy framework – is now going through the approval process by the European Parliament and Council.

The report on the state of the Energy Union also includes reports on renewables, energy efficiency, the EU carbon market, carbon capture and storage and fuel quality.

However, there is also a little gem in the form of a staff working document on energy storage – the role of electricity. Whenever possible, EiD provides posts on energy storage and it is encouraging to see this staff working document. As the report states, energy storage is a key component in providing flexibility and supporting renewable energy integration in the energy system. The report provides an overview of existing energy storage technologies. It also addresses some of the market aspects and regulations that allow energy storage to effectively contribute to the energy system.

The report provides a good basis to support market design proposals, considerations for grid planning, the role and opportunities for storage operators and much more.

The winter package gave more attention to energy storage. Now we are seeing more substance from the Commission on the role and benefits of greater emphasis on energy storage. This has to be a welcome development.

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