Green hydrogen seen as way forward for Scotland’s whisky distilleries

The aim is for green hydrogen to be produced using energy generated by onshore and offshore wind farms. The fuel could be used in industrial processes, such as heating stills for whisky distilleries, or plant operations in the port. Greig Cameron discusses latest developments in an article on The Times website.

 

Whisky goes green with hydrogen

Whisky distilleries, homes and transport across the Highlands are set to be powered by hydrogen under plans for a new energy hub at the Port of Cromarty Firth.

A feasibility study this month will look into what is needed to ensure clean fuel can be used around the area and help Scotland’s ambitions towards net zero emissions.

Tens of millions of pounds of investment are likely to be needed with the potential to create hundreds of jobs.

The first phase of the study will focus on distilleries with the report expected in June.

The aim is for green hydrogen to be produced using energy generated by onshore and offshore wind farms. Those would be used to power an onshore electrolyser which produces the hydrogen.

The fuel could be used in industrial processes, such as heating stills for whisky distilleries, or plant operations in the port. There are also longer-term possibilities in sectors such as transport and aquaculture.

The project is being led by Pale Blue Dot, which is also involved in developing a carbon capture and storage scheme in the northeast of Scotland.

They have been joined in the hydrogen plan by the port authorities, Scottish Power and the whisky companies Glenmorangie, Whyte & Mackay and Diageo.

Bob Buskie, the chief executive of the port, said: “In the short term, we have a number of local partners with vast experience in hydrogen, distilling and utility provision who want to decarbonise their operations.

“And in the long term there is a huge opportunity to decarbonise Highland industry, transport and heat, as well as exporting green hydrogen to other parts of the UK and mainland Europe, which doesn’t have the same offshore wind capacity as Scotland.”

Peter Nelson, the operations director at the Glenmorangie Company, said “The hub will ensure the region potentially becomes a centre for this emerging technology.”

The Port of Nigg is also looking into a hydrogen hub.

External link

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.