New EEA briefing on policies and measures to reduce air pollution and GHG emissions separately

EU Member States report on their policies and measures to reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions separately. A European Environment Agency (EEA) briefing, published this week, reveals that Member States identify links to climate action in about one third of their reported actions planned to reduce air pollution.

 

National measures to cut air pollution would benefit from stronger links with climate action

The EEA briefing ‘Measures to reduce emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases: the potential for synergies’ presents an overview of the latest policies and measures (PaMs) reported by Member States to tackle air pollution, as required under the National Emission reduction Commitments (NEC) Directive.

Policies to reduce emissions of three important air pollutants – ammonia (NH3), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) – mainly focus on the agriculture, transport and energy sectors, the EEA briefing shows.

The EEA briefing also looks at links between the policies and measures tackling air pollutant emissions and those to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The briefing shows that Member States have identified about one third of their air pollution policies to have links with national policies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, which are reported under the Regulation on a mechanism for monitoring and reporting greenhouse gas emissions (MMR).

According to the EEA briefing, it’s vital to seek coherence across these areas. Promoting consistency in reporting policies and measures on air pollution, energy and climate change can reduce red tape, foster policy coherence and support the identification of synergies across efforts towards zero pollution and climate neutrality in Europe.

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